One step at a time

Since my breast cancer treatment I have noticed some things hinder me and some things help me as I move forward to find direction and a way to keep going. I have to remember and remind myself that I can only take one step at a time and that it’s enough to take one step at a time. I can’t run before I can walk.

What has hindered me most is the collateral damage from my treatments, the late effects, especially the fatigue, hot flushes, infections, migraines and back pain. The late effects can make me feel anxious. There are times I can’t push through and it is all I can do to be. At these times it helps me to remind myself that it’s okay to be. It helps to remind myself I am not in a competition or a race with anyone else. I’m not out to prove myself to anyone else. Neither am I in a competition or a race with myself. I don’t have to prove myself to myself.

Comparing myself with other people hinders me. It’s helpful to remind myself I am the only person who lives my life, in my body, with my background, my circumstances and my experiences. Comparing myself now with myself then isn’t helpful either. It is important to be compassionate, kind, loving and non-judgemental to myself.

It helps me to use the analogy of going for a walk. There are all sorts of things I (usually subconsciously) take into consideration before I go for a walk: How am I feeling? What is the weather forecast like? How much time do I have? What sort of walk do I want to do? Do I want to be alone or do I want company? How far do I want to go? What shall I wear? What might I need? Drink, snacks, first aid, tissues, money, phone etc? Are there any cafes or pubs on the walk? And so on.

Similarly, as I move forwards and navigate my life post primary breast cancer diagnosis and treatment there are all sorts of things I am taking into consideration.

How am I feeling, mentally, physically and spiritually? Am I getting out of kilter? Why? Is there something I need to address in my life in order to have a greater sense of equilibrium?

The forecast is uncertain and I can’t control the future but I am thankful to be alive now.

Recently, I’ve been thinking a lot about the sort of life I want. I have to take off any clothes that hold me back and put on the ones that help me go forward. Take off the heavy clothes and put on the lighter clothes. To have that sense of freedom and joy I have when I’m walking barefoot on a beach.

Self-care is not an optional extra but a necessity and a priority.

Going for a walk usually involves some kind of planning even if it’s a ‘I’ll head off in that direction and then see’ plan. I enjoy exploring and keeping my options open and I love spontaneity but I drift if I don’t have some framework, some plan. When I’m walking I keep looking forwards. If I look backwards I will lose my footing or trip and fall and I won’t get anywhere. So I set eyes on the direction I’m going in and look ahead. I might set myself smaller goals along the way. I also might stop and take a break and look around or look back and notice how far I’ve come.

When I go on walks I like to stop sometimes to take photos. Sometimes I pick up something to remind me of the walk, such as a feather, a leaf, a shell or a stone. When I was at my weakest during chemotherapy I couldn’t sit up without help. So I set myself small incremental goals. Sit up, sit up for longer, stand with help, stand by myself, walk with the help of someone else to the bathroom, walk by myself to the bathroom, walk around our home, walk around the garden, walk to the end of the road and so on. Sometimes I look back at some of the photos taken during that time. They remind me that I kept going then and I will keep going now.

It helps to have other people to help me such as close friends and family, health care professionals and counsellors. Sometimes just having someone outside the situation to chat with is invaluable. For example, earlier this year I was going somewhere unknown and I started panicking. I was worried about how I would cope with one of my late effects. When I spoke with my counsellor I was able to think through what I could do to take away some of the unknowns.

It’s not just about me. Life experience has taught me and my husband that we have to hold any plans we make loosely. During the last few years serious illnesses have led to many of my and our plans being upended but at the moment we’re moving forward with a plan that might lead to a(nother) major life change. It brings another level of uncertainty into the mix and is both scary and exciting. As I (and we) move forward into the unknown we don’t know how it’s going to turn out.

Years ago I heard someone say something along the lines of ‘we need to plan as though we are going to live forever but live each day as if it is our last’. I like that.

3 thoughts on “One step at a time

  1. Hey Julia,
    I enjoyed reading this and learning how you’re walking your path. I especially like how you make a distinction between looking back and losing your footing, and looking back just to appreciate how far you’ve come. I find it easy to get stuck in regret and what if when I look back so it helps to have your perspective of seeing it as a reminder of how far you’ve come.
    I wish you the best with what’s ahead on your path.
    Best to you,
    Connie

    Liked by 1 person

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