Guest Blog ‘Book Review: 100 Stories edited by Helena Traill’ by @Coldethyl2

‘Book review: 100 Stories edited by Helena Traill

I’d like to thank J at Welliesandseaweed for inviting me to contribute this review to her blog.

100 Stories is a collection of cancer stories and images collated by Helena Traill and self- published through a Kickstarter project appeal. Starting life as a final year piece for her degree at Central St Martins, the book is an attempt to harness the power of design and story telling, in order to help normalise the experience of, and conversations around, a diagnosis of cancer. Contributors were recruited via social media platforms and asked to narrate their cancer story, focussing on how social media has helped them as they live with and beyond diagnosis.

Each participant in the project was asked to provide a portrait photograph of themselves which Helena digitised using the symbol that forms the logo of cancer charity, Cancer on board, who are one of the supporters of the project. These images accompany the stories in the book and form a moving adjunct to the narrative, making the accounts both seem more direct and personal through their obvious connection to “real” people, while simultaneously conveying the sense of separation and loneliness that a diagnosis brings through the emotional distance that using a pixellated image creates.

I was familiar with some but not all of the contributors through my own use of social media, but it was interesting to read their accounts in a less fragmented format than is the norm on the likes of Twitter or Instagram, particularly the extended accounts towards the end of the book. It was refreshing also to hear from some of the lesser known online contributors rather than the usual “cancer celebrities” that now dominate the various social media platforms, and in this book, Helena has given those people a voice along with another medium to share what it is like to live with a cancer diagnosis on an a everyday basis, rather than in the false glow of a heavily curated virtual reality.

As with its online counterparts, the contributors are predominately females with breast cancer, but one can hope that the common ground of many of the experiences shared in this book will help open up the dialogue around living with a cancer diagnosis, regardless of sex, gender or race. With 1 in 2 of us likely to experience cancer at some point in our lives, the common threads of resilience, hope and finding joy in living shared by this book’s contributors are ones that should encourage anyone beginning their own cancer story. Cancer can feel very isolating, but as this book shows, there are others out there who understand our experiences and social media communities that can offer the necessary support that sadly our healthcare systems all too often cannot.

I ordered my copy from Amazon for £20 including p &p and it arrived promptly and nicely packaged. It is a beautifully presented book and I would recommend it for those with cancer themselves, as well as a suitable gift for anyone touched by the disease.

© Coldethyl2′

(When I was writing my blog about my involvement in 100 Stories I thought it would be interesting to have some feedback about the book from someone who has been affected by cancer but who was not involved in the project. I knew D, who tweets as @Coldethyl2, was already reading the book so sent her a message to ask if she’d consider writing a guest review for my blog. She kindly said yes and has shared her thoughts in this brilliant and thoughtful review, which covers some salient points. Many thanks D!)

Advent

It’s the beginning of Advent. I’ve been thinking about what the season means to me.

First of all the memories. Growing up in the 1970s and 1980s watching the presenters make the Blue Peter Advent Crown every year was a childhood tradition.

Another tradition was the card Advent calendars. I found it exciting to see what lay behind each window in the lead up to Christmas, the pictures of beach balls, teddy bears and toy cars. Then came the chocolate Advent calendars, hmm chocolate! Now you can buy Advent calendars filled with different treats, Lego, cosmetics, perfume, skincare, candles, beer, wine, spirits, breakfast cereal, chutney, popcorn … Of course you can also make your own.

One of the things I like about social media is the sharing of ideas. One of the ideas that has gained traction in the last few years is the Reverse Advent Calendar which involves filling an empty cardboard box with one item everyday during Advent and donating it to a local food bank.

Since my cancer diagnosis and treatment Advent has become more meaningful for me as a time of both reflection and expectation, intentionally being in the present and waiting as I reflect on my faith and hope.